CARCHARHINUS LIMBATUS PDF

Dorsal fins, pectoral fins, and lower lobe of caudal fin have black tips. A pale band extends along its flank from the region of its pectoral fin to its pelvic fin. SIZE Males mature at 5. The largest shark caught was an 8. Teeth of the upper jaw are broad with narrow cusps, and teeth of the lower jaw are narrow. Prey — The shark feeds on schooling fish, small sharks, rays, squid and cuttlefish.

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Indo-Pacific: Persian Gulf Ref. Short description Morphology Morphometrics Dorsal spines total : 0; Dorsal soft rays total : 0; Anal spines : 0; Anal soft rays : 0. A stout shark with a long, narrow, pointed snout, long gill slits and erect, narrow-cusped upper teeth; first dorsal fin high; no interdorsal ridge Ref.

Dark grey, ashy blue or dusky bronze on back, belly white or yellowish white; a dark band extending rearward along each side to about over origin of pelvic fin; tips of pelvic fins with a persistent black spot; tips of dorsal fins, pectoral fins, anal, and lower lobe of caudal fin usually black or dusky in young individuals, fading with growth Ref.

Often off river mouths and estuaries, muddy bays, mangrove swamps, lagoons, and coral reef drop-offs Ref. Bottom associated or pelagic Ref. Young common along beaches Ref. Active hunter in midwater Ref. Feeds mainly on pelagic and benthic fishes, also small sharks and rays, cephalopods and crustaceans Ref. Viviparous Ref. Produces litters of one to 10 young Ref.

Incriminated in very few attacks but dangerous when provoked Ref. Often taken by shore anglers Ref. Used fresh for human consumption, hides for leather, liver for oil Ref. Parthenogenesis has been observed in a captive female Ref. Viviparous, with a yolk-sac placenta, 1 to 10 young per litter. Gestation period is 10 to 12 months. Nursery and pupping grounds are located inshore where pregnant females go to drop their young. Females are thought to spawn only every two years. Size at birth cm Ref.

Collaborators Compagno, L. FAO Species Catalogue. Sharks of the world. An annotated and illustrated catalogue of shark species known to date. Part 2 - Carcharhiniformes. FAO Fish. Rome: FAO. Sounds Ciguatera Speed Swim. Estimates based on models Preferred temperature Ref. Phylogenetic diversity index Ref. Trophic Level Ref. Resilience Ref. Vulnerability Ref. Price category Ref.

Common name e. Gadus morhua. Add your observation in Fish Watcher Native range All suitable habitat Point map Year This map was computer-generated and has not yet been reviewed. Marine; brackish; reef-associated; amphidromous Ref. Maturity: L m Dorsal spines total : 0; Dorsal soft rays total : 0; Anal spines : 0; Anal soft rays : 0.

An inshore and offshore shark found on or adjacent to continental and insular shelves Ref. Distinct pairing with embrace Ref. Compagno, L. CMS Ref. Collaborators Pictures Stamps, Coins Misc. Summary page Point data Common names Photos. Preferred temperature Ref. Entered by Carpenter, Kent E.

Modified by Valdestamon, Roxanne Rei. Fish Forum. Sign our Guest Book. Back to Search. Native range All suitable habitat Point map Year This map was computer-generated and has not yet been reviewed.

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Blacktip shark

Indo-Pacific: Persian Gulf Ref. Short description Morphology Morphometrics Dorsal spines total : 0; Dorsal soft rays total : 0; Anal spines : 0; Anal soft rays : 0. A stout shark with a long, narrow, pointed snout, long gill slits and erect, narrow-cusped upper teeth; first dorsal fin high; no interdorsal ridge Ref. Dark grey, ashy blue or dusky bronze on back, belly white or yellowish white; a dark band extending rearward along each side to about over origin of pelvic fin; tips of pelvic fins with a persistent black spot; tips of dorsal fins, pectoral fins, anal, and lower lobe of caudal fin usually black or dusky in young individuals, fading with growth Ref. Often off river mouths and estuaries, muddy bays, mangrove swamps, lagoons, and coral reef drop-offs Ref. Bottom associated or pelagic Ref.

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Human uses

Their first dorsal fin is slightly posterior back from their pectoral fins and high on the midsection of their backs with a narrow, pointed tip. This species does not have an interdorsal ridge. They are dark gray or blue to brown on their dorsal upper sides with white ventral under sides and a white band across their flanks. Their pectoral fins, first and second dorsal fins, pelvic fins, and lower caudal tail lobe are black tipped, although the dark coloring tends to fade with age.

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Carcharhinus limbatus

The blacktip shark Carcharhinus limbatus is a species of requiem shark , and part of the family Carcharhinidae. It is common to coastal tropical and subtropical waters around the world, including brackish habitats. Genetic analyses have revealed substantial variation within this species, with populations from the western Atlantic Ocean isolated and distinct from those in the rest of its range. The blacktip shark has a stout, fusiform body with a pointed snout, long gill slits , and no ridge between the dorsal fins. Most individuals have black tips or edges on the pectoral , dorsal, pelvic , and caudal fins. It usually attains a length of 1. Swift, energetic piscivores , blacktip sharks are known to make spinning leaps out of the water while attacking schools of small fish.

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This medium sized, stocky shark is dark grey to brown on top transitioning to white underneath. It has characteristically marked black-tipped fins. Blacktip sharks prefer to hunt small schooling fishes, taking out prey as they move quickly through the school, often breaching the water at the surface. They are generally timid, but because they forage in shallower waters less than ft , are frequently encountered by humans. The blacktip shark gets its name from its distinctive black markings on the tips of its fins. The blacktip shark is targeted in a number of commercial fisheries, including the longline fishery off the southeast coast of the U.

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